Performance

Performance Theme Leader

Dr Michelle Magee

Post Doctoral Research Fellow

michelle.magee@unimelb.edu.au

Google Scholar

Background

Inadequate sleep has widespread effects on core brain function and is known to induce changes in our performance, attention, and our ability to make decisions. In safety-critical environments, this can lead to human-error related accidents, incidents and injuries.

The way we speak can tell us a lot about our performance and ability to make decisions and can provide a non-invasive method to detect changes in our core function. Our performance theme investigates the use of speech signals to explore and determine if speech changes can be detected within various environments of stress, mental load and performance impairment.

Potential projects

These research project are available to PhD students to join as part of their thesis. Please contact the Theme Leader to discuss your options.

  • speech as a signature biomarker of performance
  • acoustic biometric analysis of speech for detecting decision making capacity under periods of stress
  • acoustic biometric analysis of speech as a proxy for fitness for duty

Collaborators

  • Prof Paul Maruff, The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health & Cogstate
  • A/Prof Steven Lockley, The Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School
  • Prof Shantha Rajaratnam,Monash University
  • A/Prof Clare Anderson, Monash University
  • A/Prof Gabrielle Todd, University of South Australia
  • Dr Athanasios Tsanas, University of Edinburgh

Seminal work

  • Magee M, Feltcher J, Maruff P, Vogel AP. Speech biometric analysis can be used to determine performance impairments under conditions of sustained wakefulness. Department of Science & Technology, Defence Human Sciences Symposium 2019.
  • Vogel, A.P., Fletcher, J., Maruff, P. Acoustic Analysis of the Effects of Sustained Wakefulness on Speech. J Acoust Soc Am. 2010;128(6):3747-3756.
  • Vogel AP, Fletcher J, Snyder PJ, Fredrickson A, Maruff P. Reliability, stability, and sensitivity to change and impairment in acoustic measures of timing and frequency. J Voice. 2011;25(2):137-149.
  • Vogel AP, Maruff P. Monitoring change requires a rethink of assessment practices in voice and speech. Logoped Phoniatr Vocol. 2014;39(2):56-61.