Internet-mediated physiotherapy and pain coping skills training for people with persistent knee pain (IMPACT)

Project Details

Persistent knee pain, in people over 50 years, is usually attributable to knee osteoarthritis (OA), a common health problem that causes physical and psychological dysfunction. Exercise delivered by physiotherapists and pain coping skills training (PCST), normally delivered by psychologists can help reduce the symptoms and impact of this pain. Usual care, especially to those living in remote areas, often involves hand-out educational information. In a time of advancing technology and increasing access to the internet, remotely delivered internet-based treatment approaches, may provide novel alternatives for healthcare delivery of exercise and PCST.  The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether a physiotherapy-guided home exercise program, delivered via the internet, combined with an online PCST program (PainCOACH) is more effective in improving pain and function than an on-line provision of educational material

Researchers

Collaborators

Duke University

  • Prof Francis Keefe

University of North Carolina

  • Dr Christine Rini

Queen's University

  • Dr Simon French

Waverley Park Physiotherapy Centre

  • Mr Andrew Dalwood

Monash University

  • Dr Jessica Kasza
  • Prof Andrew Forbes

University of Otago

  • A/Prof Haxby Abbott

Funding

National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Program Grant #631717

Research Outcomes

Internet-mediated physiotherapy and pain coping skills training for people with persistent knee pain (IMPACT – knee pain): a randomised controlled trial protocol

Research Group

Musculoskeletal and Sports Rehabilitation



Faculty Research Themes

Infection and Immunology

School Research Themes

Recovery and Rehabilitation Across the Lifespan



Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact the research group leader.

Department / Centre

Physiotherapy